Albuquerque travel guide

Albuquerque Tourism | Albuquerque Guide

You're Going to Love Albuquerque

Nestled at the base of the Sandia Mountains, Albuquerque is New Mexico's jewel. That's not just an empty phrase. The city of turquoise is packed with jewelry makers and artisan designers, but there's much more available than just beautiful accessories.

If you want to escape from the urban scene, Albuquerque is the perfect base for a trip into the Sandia Mountains, where you can climb, hike, ride, bike or ski when the season is right.

Back in town, this three hundred-year-old colonial town retains much of its historic charm. Wander the streets of the Old Town and visit the Turquoise Museum. Check out the Museum of Art and History and dine at high-class but affordable New Mexican restaurants like Acapulco or el Pinto.

There are even high-energy sporting events to attend, like Lobos basketball matches in "the Pit." So what are you waiting for? Albuquerque is there for you to explore, at almost any time of year.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Albuquerque

The New Mexico Landscape

Albuquerque is situated at the foot of the Sandia Mountains, where visitors can hike, ride horses, go rock climbing, descend mountain biking slopes or even ski when the snows arrive. If you want to blend urban activities with beautiful scenery, there aren't many better destinations.

Arts and Crafts

Albuquerque has a long tradition of Native American and Spanish-influenced arts and crafts, making it a fantastic place to pick up ornaments for your home or souvenirs for friends. Head to the Turquoise Museum to find gorgeous blue jewelry, or the galleries and craft stores in Nob Hill and the Old Town to snap up unique gifts.

Museums and History

Visiting Albuquerque is also a great option for history lovers. The Old Town has been thriving for three hundred years, and taking a walking tour to sites like the Church of San Felipe de Neri is like traveling back in time. There are also plenty of wonderful museums, including the Museum of Art and History and the family-friendly !Explora! Science Center.

College Sports

Albuquerque is home to the University of New Mexico, and students there love their sports. Head to "the Pit" to watch the Lobos compete in NCAA Basketball or catch a college football match at University Stadium.

Superb New Mexican Cuisine

Albuquerque has also become a dining hotspot, famous for its fiery red and green chile sauces and boasting a wide selection of high-quality eateries. Some of the best around include Beralas, el Pinto and Ortega's.

What to do in Albuquerque

1. Albuquerque Museum: The City's Center for Art and Culture

Situated in the heart of Old Town off Route 66 is the Albuquerque Museum, the epitome of Albuquerque's cultural community. Submerge yourself in this rich, world-class collection of art dating back 400 years. The vast collection includes stunning work, from O'Keefe to Alvarado and Bosque to Blumenschein. Marvel at the spectacular suits of Spanish armor as well as the historic wood carvings, and be sure to stop by the Slate Street Café for a toast to Albuquerque's premier cultural institution.

2. Old Town: Be a Part Of History

Walk back in time to 300 years ago when the city of Albuquerque first began, down to the 150 galleries, quiet adobe buildings, excellent restaurants, the charming hotels, and inviting nightlife of the modern day Old Town. Catch one of the spectacular performances by the dancers or musicians at the picturesque gazebo. Get fantastic souvenirs at the Old Town Basket & Rug Shop and extinguish the hunger flames at the Garduño's at Old Town and sample the best in Mexican delectable. It's open 10am-5pm during summer and 10am-4:30 pm for the rest of the year.

3. ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden: Explore The Beauty Of Mother Nature

Located along the Rio Grande River southeast of Old Town, The New Bio Park is home to four major attractions: the Albuquerque Aquarium, Rio Grande Zoo, Tingley Beach, and the Rio Grande Botanical Gardens. The 285,000-gallon shark tank is a must-see for anyone with children. Stroll along the park's serene walking paths and explore the lush 36-acre botanical garden which exhibits meticulously manicured grounds as well as a variety of exotic plant species and insects. Get mesmerized by the hundreds of diverse species like lions, tigers, and bears all housed in the park.

4. Indian Pueblo Cultural Center: Home of The Pueblo People

This vibrant cultural hub is located 2 miles northeast of Old Town. Get to learn about the indigenous tribes of the Pueblo people by exploring this unique educational facility, which showcases the culture and preserves the history of the Pueblo people. Munch on tasty traditional dishes at the Pueblo Harvest Cafe & Bakery. Enjoy captivating traditional dances and be a part of the vibrant cultural events, tours, workshops, and lectures. Stop by Shumakolokwa Gifts for enchanting keepsakes. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is open daily from 9am-5pm.

5. San Felipe de Neri Parish: Respite Second To None

Sitting on the north side of Old Town Plaza, the 300-year-old San Felipe de Neri Parish building features a school, rectory, museum, and convent. Constructed in 1793, the church's unique southwestern architecture emanates unmatched beauty. Explore the breathtaking sculptures in the small garden and revel in the quiet respite that is second to none.

6. Route 66: America's Highway, at the Heart of Amarillo

While Chuck Berry reminded us that Route 66 wound for more than 2,000 miles from Chicago to Los Angeles, the section around Amarillo is one of the most special. The iconic highway passes straight through the city (and was name-checked by Berry), where it has become a fabulous place to dine, drink, and shop. Take a stroll down the strip and check out all of the businesses, but have a look at the events schedule too, as Route 66 is the venue for everything from antique markets to fancy-dress scavenger hunts and car shows. If nothing else, it's a classic all-American attraction right at the heart of town.

1. Albuquerque Museum: The City's Center for Art and Culture

Situated in the heart of Old Town off Route 66 is the Albuquerque Museum, the epitome of Albuquerque's cultural community. Submerge yourself in this rich, world-class collection of art dating back 400 years. The vast collection includes stunning work, from O'Keefe to Alvarado and Bosque to Blumenschein. Marvel at the spectacular suits of Spanish armor as well as the historic wood carvings, and be sure to stop by the Slate Street Café for a toast to Albuquerque's premier cultural institution.

2. Old Town: Be a Part Of History

Walk back in time to 300 years ago when the city of Albuquerque first began, down to the 150 galleries, quiet adobe buildings, excellent restaurants, the charming hotels, and inviting nightlife of the modern day Old Town. Catch one of the spectacular performances by the dancers or musicians at the picturesque gazebo. Get fantastic souvenirs at the Old Town Basket & Rug Shop and extinguish the hunger flames at the Garduño's at Old Town and sample the best in Mexican delectable. It's open 10am-5pm during summer and 10am-4:30 pm for the rest of the year.

3. ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden: Explore The Beauty Of Mother Nature

Located along the Rio Grande River southeast of Old Town, The New Bio Park is home to four major attractions: the Albuquerque Aquarium, Rio Grande Zoo, Tingley Beach, and the Rio Grande Botanical Gardens. The 285,000-gallon shark tank is a must-see for anyone with children. Stroll along the park's serene walking paths and explore the lush 36-acre botanical garden which exhibits meticulously manicured grounds as well as a variety of exotic plant species and insects. Get mesmerized by the hundreds of diverse species like lions, tigers, and bears all housed in the park.

4. Indian Pueblo Cultural Center: Home of The Pueblo People

This vibrant cultural hub is located 2 miles northeast of Old Town. Get to learn about the indigenous tribes of the Pueblo people by exploring this unique educational facility, which showcases the culture and preserves the history of the Pueblo people. Munch on tasty traditional dishes at the Pueblo Harvest Cafe & Bakery. Enjoy captivating traditional dances and be a part of the vibrant cultural events, tours, workshops, and lectures. Stop by Shumakolokwa Gifts for enchanting keepsakes. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is open daily from 9am-5pm.

5. San Felipe de Neri Parish: Respite Second To None

Sitting on the north side of Old Town Plaza, the 300-year-old San Felipe de Neri Parish building features a school, rectory, museum, and convent. Constructed in 1793, the church's unique southwestern architecture emanates unmatched beauty. Explore the breathtaking sculptures in the small garden and revel in the quiet respite that is second to none.

6. Route 66: America's Highway, at the Heart of Amarillo

While Chuck Berry reminded us that Route 66 wound for more than 2,000 miles from Chicago to Los Angeles, the section around Amarillo is one of the most special. The iconic highway passes straight through the city (and was name-checked by Berry), where it has become a fabulous place to dine, drink, and shop. Take a stroll down the strip and check out all of the businesses, but have a look at the events schedule too, as Route 66 is the venue for everything from antique markets to fancy-dress scavenger hunts and car shows. If nothing else, it's a classic all-American attraction right at the heart of town.

Where to Eat in Albuquerque

The finest food in Albuquerque is, unsurprisingly, Mexican and Mexican-influenced. However, there are some subtle local differences with standard Mexican food. In particular, New Mexican cooking revolves around red or green chile sauces and sopapilla breads to soak up the sauce. Check out some of the finest examples of regional cuisine at Acapulco, Federico's and El Pinto. Looking beyond Mexican food, Asian Grill serves affordable Vietnamese dishes; Rasoi is a superb Indian option, and the Rancher's Club is an elite seafood and prime meat joint. Dining out isn't too expensive. Expect a mid-range meal to cost around $15 and gourmet meals to cost upwards of $25.

When to visit Albuquerque

Albuquerque in April
Estimated hotel price
£74
1 night at 3-star hotel
Albuquerque in April
Estimated hotel price
£74
1 night at 3-star hotel

The fall is definitely Albuquerque's most attractive season, so schedule a trip between September and November to take advantage of mild weather and a packed cultural calendar. However, winter has its appeal as well, with ski slopes opening in the Sandia Mountains. Summer can be a little too hot for some, but with lower hotel rates, it's a great time to head to Albuquerque for a relaxing break.

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Celcius (°C)
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How to Get to Albuquerque

Plane

Albuquerque International Sunport is a major regional airport in the American west, and is served by airlines like American, Southwest, Delta, and United. The most affordable route into the center of town is to catch bus route 50, which costs just $1. Taxis into the city will cost around $20-25 and shuttle buses are also available to major hotels like the Hyatt Regency.

Train

Albuquerque's central station is located at the Alvarado Transportation Center in the Downtown neighborhood and is a stop on the Southwest Chief service, which travels daily between Chicago and Los Angeles.

Car

If you are driving from the west, take I-40 straight into Albuquerque. Those coming from the east can also take I-40 or I-25 from cities to the north.

Bus

Greyhound is the main intercity bus operator in Albuquerque, and their stop is at the Alvarado Transportation Center (320 First St SW). There are also services from Mexican cities, which are provided by Autobuses Americanos.

Airports near Albuquerque

Airlines serving Albuquerque

Lufthansa
Good (1,385 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (2,464 reviews)
American Airlines
Good (3,901 reviews)
KLM
Good (292 reviews)
Air France
Good (299 reviews)
Delta
Excellent (2,657 reviews)
British Airways
Good (941 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (937 reviews)
Iberia
Good (668 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (642 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (663 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (203 reviews)
Finnair
Good (450 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Good (155 reviews)
Spirit Airlines
Good (2,250 reviews)
Alaska Airlines
Excellent (1,949 reviews)
ITA Airways
Good (36 reviews)
JetBlue
Good (1,139 reviews)
Aeromexico
Good (789 reviews)
Aer Lingus
Good (305 reviews)
Show more

Where to stay in Albuquerque

Nob Hill and Downtown Albuquerque are the neighborhoods to look at if you are seeking luxury family accommodation. If your budget stretches far enough, don't miss the stunning Hotel Andaluz, designed in a traditional Spanish-influenced style. Other reliable, comfortable options include the Sheraton, Radisson and Hyatt and there are also some lovely bed and breakfasts, including Mauger Estate and the Bottger Mansion.

Popular neighbourhoods in Albuquerque

Downtown – Recently targeted by a decade-long development plan, the center of Albuquerque now has it all. The area includes the city's main nightlife strip along Route 66, traditional diners like 66 Diner and plenty of museums, including the Museum of Art and History and the completely unique Rattlesnake Museum.

Nob Hill – An area filled with luxurious colonial-style mansions and chic restaurants like Elaine's, most vacationers will feel right at home in Nob Hill. The Nob Hill Shopping Center is the place to head for artisan jewelry and other souvenirs, while bars like Scalo offer live music all night, almost every night of the year.

Albuquerque Old Town – The city was founded way back in 1706, and the Old Town is its historic nucleus. Just to the north of Downtown, you can tour the city's oldest neighborhood, seeing beautiful buildings like the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe and checking out museums like the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. The Turquoise Museum is also a fantastic place to find the bright blue stones that the area around Albuquerque is famous for.

Most popular hotel in Albuquerque by neighbourhood

Where to stay in popular areas of Albuquerque

Most booked hotels in Albuquerque

Baymont by Wyndham Albuquerque Airport
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
£87+
TownePlace Suites by Marriott Albuquerque Airport
Excellent (8.5, Excellent reviews)
£108+
Best Western Plus Rio Grande Inn
Excellent (8.1, Excellent reviews)
£132+
Best Western Airport Albuquerque Innsuites Hotel & Suites
Good (7.9, Good reviews)
£94+
Sheraton Albuquerque Airport Hotel
Good (7.6, Good reviews)
£120+
Hilton Garden Inn Albuquerque Airport
Good (7.4, Good reviews)
£112+
See all hotels

How to Get Around Albuquerque

Public Transportation

Buses in Albuquerque are provided by ABC Ride, but the service is not extensive or particularly reliable. However, routes 766 and 777 (the red and green lines) are useful for traveling along Central Avenue and day passes cost just $2.

Taxis

Taxis may well be essential for many visitors who don't have access to a rental vehicle. Rates vary between companies, but will typically be around $2.70-3 for the meter drop, then $2.60 per mile after that (so taxis aren't cheap). You can travel more cheaply by using Uber, however, who charge $1 for the meter drop, then $0.85 for every subsequent mile.

Car

Albuquerque is very much a city built around the automobile. Be aware that the street names are divided into four quadrants, separated on an east-west axis by the railroad and a north-south axis by Central Avenue. You can also get to most east-west destinations using I-40 and north-south destinations via I-25, so getting around isn't hard.

The Cost of Living in Albuquerque

Shopping Streets

If you want to walk around a shopping district filled with souvenir stores, then Old Town is the place to visit. There you'll find galleries like Amapola, selling affordable local ornaments and paintings, Native American pottery outlets like Andrews Pueblo Pottery and stores where anything is possible, like the Old Town Emporium. Other than that, Nob Hill and Central Avenue have clusters of boutiques, while Coronado Mall in Uptown features major brands like J.C. Penney and Sears.

Groceries and Other

Self-catering vacationers can save money during their stay by shopping for groceries at stores like Walmart, John Brooks, Trader Joe's and Whole Foods, while you can shop for local produce at the La Montañita Co-op as well. In general, the city is fairly cheap, with a gallon of milk costing under $3 and a pound of apples around $1.20.

Cheap meal
£9.01
A pair of jeans
£30.56
Single public transport ticket
£0.82
Cappuccino
£3.24
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