Sheffield travel guide

Sheffield Tourism | Sheffield Guide

You're Going to Love Sheffield

Sheffield is one of the largest cities in England and if you love arts and culture or wide open spaces, you'll feel right at home. The city is equally appealing to sports fans. Soccer, hockey, speedway - it's all here.

Top 5 Reasons to Visit Sheffield

1. Impressive Venues

Catch a top stage production at the Crucible, the Sheffield Theatre complex's main auditorium, or see what's on at the Lyceum, one of the city's oldest theaters.

2. Weston Park Museum

Kids will love this museum's eclectic range of exhibits such as Snowy the polar bear, Egyptian mummies, and even a butcher's shop.

3. Those Famous Green Spaces

The Winter Garden boasts Europe's largest city center temperate glasshouse, while the glass pavilions and some plants and trees at the Botanical Gardens date from 1836.

4. Sheffield Arena

Home to the Steelers, the city's hockey team, Sheffield Arena was built for the World Student Games and opened by the Queen in 1981. Go to see the Steelers play or for concerts, ice shows, and theater productions.

5. Its Friendly Pubs and Clubs

Stop for a drink in a traditional pub such as the Red Deer in Pitt Street, or see live bands at popular venues like the Leadmill, Corporation, and Plug.

1. Impressive Venues

Catch a top stage production at the Crucible, the Sheffield Theatre complex's main auditorium, or see what's on at the Lyceum, one of the city's oldest theaters.

2. Weston Park Museum

Kids will love this museum's eclectic range of exhibits such as Snowy the polar bear, Egyptian mummies, and even a butcher's shop.

3. Those Famous Green Spaces

The Winter Garden boasts Europe's largest city center temperate glasshouse, while the glass pavilions and some plants and trees at the Botanical Gardens date from 1836.

4. Sheffield Arena

Home to the Steelers, the city's hockey team, Sheffield Arena was built for the World Student Games and opened by the Queen in 1981. Go to see the Steelers play or for concerts, ice shows, and theater productions.

5. Its Friendly Pubs and Clubs

Stop for a drink in a traditional pub such as the Red Deer in Pitt Street, or see live bands at popular venues like the Leadmill, Corporation, and Plug.

What to do in Sheffield

1. Graves Art Gallery: Looking Back on British Art

Part of the city of Sheffield's collection of three museums and galleries, the Graves Art Gallery focuses on showcasing modern and historical works of art, especially those of 19th- and 20th-century British and European artists. Its extensive permanent collection is expertly curated to reflect on 400 years of European art viewed through eight distinct exhibition rooms. The airy and well-lit galleries provide plenty of room for quiet reflection and contemplation as light streams across its high ceilings. Besides major new acquisitions (that have re-commenced since 2009), its notable artists include J. M. W. Turner, Alfred Sisley, and Helen Chadwick.

2. Sheffield Cathedral: A Gothic Ode to God

Sheffield's 1000-year young (and counting) majestic cathedral is a sight for sore eyes - both religious and secular ones. Whether travelers are believers in a higher power or simply the beguiling architectural wonder of its high ceilings and modernist arches, the Sheffield Cathedral welcomes visitors of all denominations to visit and explore its wonders throughout the day, from Sunday to Sunday. The church also organizes interesting initiatives such as Art and Spirituality, focused on discovering art in religion.

3. Sheffield Town Hall: A Public Work of Architectural Triumph

The Peace Gardens are the serene greens that surround the majestic Sheffield Town Hall and they offer the perfect vantage point from which to take in this grand building's presence, and feature a walk-in fountain, perfect for children. The Town Hall itself was constructed over a seven year period and features beautiful Gothic-style clock towers and turrets. Once you've taken your fill of its embellished exterior, venture inside where you'll be greeted by a stunning marble staircase and the first floor gallery will capture your thirst for British history, furniture, and art.

4. Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet: The Making of The Crucible

Not quite Arthur Miller's play, the Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet celebrates steel-working and smithery as the crucible of the local Industrial Revolution. The former scythe-making plant and smithy shop are now part of the larger area noted as Abbeydal Industrial Hamlet, which includes workers' cottages, water-powered dams, and a museum that perfectly preserves and showcases the machines involved in the process of making steel from iron and coke. The Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet is an ideal afternoon jaunt for those who are curious to relive an era gone by, but not forgotten.

5. Kelham Island Museum: First a Foundry

The most interesting thing about the museum on Alma Street was that it was created on an entirely man-made island as a result of a mill race dating back to the 12th century. The museum features exhibitions that focus on science and local industry, combining reconstructions of historical workshops and various machines, such as a 12,000-horsepower steam engine and the largest Bessemer converter in England. As the main hub of the European Route of Industrial Heritage, the museum also curates and maintains a vast collection of photographs for archival and illustrative purposes.

1. Graves Art Gallery: Looking Back on British Art

Part of the city of Sheffield's collection of three museums and galleries, the Graves Art Gallery focuses on showcasing modern and historical works of art, especially those of 19th- and 20th-century British and European artists. Its extensive permanent collection is expertly curated to reflect on 400 years of European art viewed through eight distinct exhibition rooms. The airy and well-lit galleries provide plenty of room for quiet reflection and contemplation as light streams across its high ceilings. Besides major new acquisitions (that have re-commenced since 2009), its notable artists include J. M. W. Turner, Alfred Sisley, and Helen Chadwick.

2. Sheffield Cathedral: A Gothic Ode to God

Sheffield's 1000-year young (and counting) majestic cathedral is a sight for sore eyes - both religious and secular ones. Whether travelers are believers in a higher power or simply the beguiling architectural wonder of its high ceilings and modernist arches, the Sheffield Cathedral welcomes visitors of all denominations to visit and explore its wonders throughout the day, from Sunday to Sunday. The church also organizes interesting initiatives such as Art and Spirituality, focused on discovering art in religion.

3. Sheffield Town Hall: A Public Work of Architectural Triumph

The Peace Gardens are the serene greens that surround the majestic Sheffield Town Hall and they offer the perfect vantage point from which to take in this grand building's presence, and feature a walk-in fountain, perfect for children. The Town Hall itself was constructed over a seven year period and features beautiful Gothic-style clock towers and turrets. Once you've taken your fill of its embellished exterior, venture inside where you'll be greeted by a stunning marble staircase and the first floor gallery will capture your thirst for British history, furniture, and art.

4. Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet: The Making of The Crucible

Not quite Arthur Miller's play, the Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet celebrates steel-working and smithery as the crucible of the local Industrial Revolution. The former scythe-making plant and smithy shop are now part of the larger area noted as Abbeydal Industrial Hamlet, which includes workers' cottages, water-powered dams, and a museum that perfectly preserves and showcases the machines involved in the process of making steel from iron and coke. The Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet is an ideal afternoon jaunt for those who are curious to relive an era gone by, but not forgotten.

5. Kelham Island Museum: First a Foundry

The most interesting thing about the museum on Alma Street was that it was created on an entirely man-made island as a result of a mill race dating back to the 12th century. The museum features exhibitions that focus on science and local industry, combining reconstructions of historical workshops and various machines, such as a 12,000-horsepower steam engine and the largest Bessemer converter in England. As the main hub of the European Route of Industrial Heritage, the museum also curates and maintains a vast collection of photographs for archival and illustrative purposes.

1. Graves Art Gallery: Looking Back on British Art

Part of the city of Sheffield's collection of three museums and galleries, the Graves Art Gallery focuses on showcasing modern and historical works of art, especially those of 19th- and 20th-century British and European artists. Its extensive permanent collection is expertly curated to reflect on 400 years of European art viewed through eight distinct exhibition rooms. The airy and well-lit galleries provide plenty of room for quiet reflection and contemplation as light streams across its high ceilings. Besides major new acquisitions (that have re-commenced since 2009), its notable artists include J. M. W. Turner, Alfred Sisley, and Helen Chadwick.

2. Sheffield Cathedral: A Gothic Ode to God

Sheffield's 1000-year young (and counting) majestic cathedral is a sight for sore eyes - both religious and secular ones. Whether travelers are believers in a higher power or simply the beguiling architectural wonder of its high ceilings and modernist arches, the Sheffield Cathedral welcomes visitors of all denominations to visit and explore its wonders throughout the day, from Sunday to Sunday. The church also organizes interesting initiatives such as Art and Spirituality, focused on discovering art in religion.

3. Sheffield Town Hall: A Public Work of Architectural Triumph

The Peace Gardens are the serene greens that surround the majestic Sheffield Town Hall and they offer the perfect vantage point from which to take in this grand building's presence, and feature a walk-in fountain, perfect for children. The Town Hall itself was constructed over a seven year period and features beautiful Gothic-style clock towers and turrets. Once you've taken your fill of its embellished exterior, venture inside where you'll be greeted by a stunning marble staircase and the first floor gallery will capture your thirst for British history, furniture, and art.

4. Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet: The Making of The Crucible

Not quite Arthur Miller's play, the Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet celebrates steel-working and smithery as the crucible of the local Industrial Revolution. The former scythe-making plant and smithy shop are now part of the larger area noted as Abbeydal Industrial Hamlet, which includes workers' cottages, water-powered dams, and a museum that perfectly preserves and showcases the machines involved in the process of making steel from iron and coke. The Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet is an ideal afternoon jaunt for those who are curious to relive an era gone by, but not forgotten.

5. Kelham Island Museum: First a Foundry

The most interesting thing about the museum on Alma Street was that it was created on an entirely man-made island as a result of a mill race dating back to the 12th century. The museum features exhibitions that focus on science and local industry, combining reconstructions of historical workshops and various machines, such as a 12,000-horsepower steam engine and the largest Bessemer converter in England. As the main hub of the European Route of Industrial Heritage, the museum also curates and maintains a vast collection of photographs for archival and illustrative purposes.

Activities & attractions in Sheffield

Where to Eat in Sheffield

Dine on classic British cuisine at Browns in St. Paul's Parade, or enjoy contemporary Italian dishes at Piccolino in Millennium Square. Lunch in a basic diner costs £7 while a meal for two with wine in a top restaurant starts at £40.

When to visit Sheffield

Sheffield in February
Estimated hotel price
£53
1 night at 3-star hotel
Sheffield in February
Estimated hotel price
£53
1 night at 3-star hotel

Summer, from May to September, is the best time to visit the nearby Peak District National Park or see the city's parks at their best. However, annual events and excellent shopping and entertainment make Sheffield a great choice at any time.

Data provided by weatherbase
Temperatures
Temperatures
Data provided by weatherbase

How to Get to Sheffield

Plane

Doncaster Sheffield Airport (DSA) is 28.5 miles from the city center via the M18. Rent a car at the airport or take the 707 shuttle bus to Doncaster Town Centre. From there, head to Doncaster Railway station to catch a train to Sheffield.

Train

An hourly train service operated by East Midland Trains runs between London and Sheffield. CrossCountry Trains offers a range of daily services for those coming from Scotland, Birmingham, or the North East. Trains terminate at Sheffield Station near the city center.

Car

Sheffield is just minutes from the M1 motorway. Take Exit 33 via Sheffield Parkway for the city center.

Bus

National Express buses travel to Sheffield from many major UK cities. Buses stop at Sheffield Interchange which is a 2-minute walk from Sheffield Station.

Plane

Doncaster Sheffield Airport (DSA) is 28.5 miles from the city center via the M18. Rent a car at the airport or take the 707 shuttle bus to Doncaster Town Centre. From there, head to Doncaster Railway station to catch a train to Sheffield.

Train

An hourly train service operated by East Midland Trains runs between London and Sheffield. CrossCountry Trains offers a range of daily services for those coming from Scotland, Birmingham, or the North East. Trains terminate at Sheffield Station near the city center.

Car

Sheffield is just minutes from the M1 motorway. Take Exit 33 via Sheffield Parkway for the city center.

Bus

National Express buses travel to Sheffield from many major UK cities. Buses stop at Sheffield Interchange which is a 2-minute walk from Sheffield Station.

Airports near Sheffield

Airlines serving Sheffield

Lufthansa
Good (4,042 reviews)
KLM
Good (758 reviews)
Delta
Good (4,474 reviews)
British Airways
Good (3,819 reviews)
SWISS
Good (872 reviews)
Turkish Airlines
Good (2,152 reviews)
Air France
Good (897 reviews)
United Airlines
Good (4,646 reviews)
Qatar Airways
Good (2,407 reviews)
Emirates
Excellent (1,991 reviews)
Iberia
Good (1,472 reviews)
Austrian Airlines
Good (447 reviews)
Air Canada
Good (4,695 reviews)
Singapore Airlines
Good (781 reviews)
Brussels Airlines
Good (214 reviews)
Finnair
Good (939 reviews)
Etihad Airways
Good (743 reviews)
TAP AIR PORTUGAL
Good (1,057 reviews)
Scandinavian Airlines
Good (773 reviews)
Ethiopian Air
Good (325 reviews)
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Where to stay in Sheffield

City Center - the city center is home to the Winter Garden and Sheffield landmarks like the Grade I listed Town Hall.

Popular Neighborhoods in Sheffield

Kelham Island Quarter - this central neighborhood is where you'll find Kelham Island Museum and the Kelham Island Tavern, two-time winner of the CAMRA National Pub of the Year award.

Sharrow - Sharrow is west of the city center. Visit Sharrow Mills, a former snuff factory on picturesque Porter Brook, or meander through Endcliffe Park.

Kelham Island Quarter - this central neighborhood is where you'll find Kelham Island Museum and the Kelham Island Tavern, two-time winner of the CAMRA National Pub of the Year award.
Sharrow - Sharrow is west of the city center. Visit Sharrow Mills, a former snuff factory on picturesque Porter Brook, or meander through Endcliffe Park.

Where to stay in popular areas of Sheffield

Most booked hotels in Sheffield

Casa Hotel
Excellent (8.8, Excellent reviews)
£85+
Leonardo Hotel Sheffield
Excellent (8.3, Excellent reviews)
£51+
Holiday Inn Rotherham-Sheffield M1,jct.33
Good (7.9, Good reviews)
£64+
ibis Budget Sheffield Centre St Marys Gate
Good (7.8, Good reviews)
£37+
ibis Chesterfield North - Barlborough
Good (7.8, Good reviews)
£33+
Days Inn by Wyndham Sheffield M1
Good (7.7, Good reviews)
£31+

How to Get Around Sheffield

Public Transportation

Purchase a dayrider ticket for £4 or a weekly superider ticket for £13.50 for unlimited travel on Stagecoach Buses and the Stagecoach Supertram.

Taxi

Taxis are readily available and a typical 5-mile trip during the day costs £14-16.

Car

You can rent a car from brands like Hertz, Europcar, or Avis. Prices start from £23 per day.

Public Transportation

Purchase a dayrider ticket for £4 or a weekly superider ticket for £13.50 for unlimited travel on Stagecoach Buses and the Stagecoach Supertram.

Taxi

Taxis are readily available and a typical 5-mile trip during the day costs £14-16.

Car

You can rent a car from brands like Hertz, Europcar, or Avis. Prices start from £23 per day.

The Cost of Living in Sheffield

Shopping Streets

Find famous brands alongside department stores at Meadowhall. Shop for keepsakes at Sheffield Antiques Quarter in Broadfield Road or find the latest designer styles on Ecclesall Road.

Groceries and Other

Stock up on food and basics at supermarkets like Morrison's, Tesco, and Sainsbury's. A quart of milk costs £0.83 and 12 large eggs cost £2.31.

Cheap meal
£12.59
A pair of jeans
£54.60
Single public transport ticket
£2.01
Cappuccino
£2.50
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